Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 480

ann2016Dear neighbor, Here is the 480th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – February 18, 2020

Regular Meeting of the Village Board

8:00 pm

(Open to Public – Televised)

 

NOTE:  This meeting is on Tuesday due to Presidents’ Day

PRESENTATIONS/OTHER: 

Review of the Environment Assessment Form Part II and the Village’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program policies by the Village Board to determine consistency related to Local Law Introductory No. 9 of 2019 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, with regards to the Municipal Place Gateway area. 

 

Review of the Environment Assessment Form Part II and the Village’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program policies by the Village Board to determine consistency related to  Local Law Introductory No. 10 of 2019 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, with regards to the North Riverside Avenue neighborhood.

As part of the State Environmental Review (SEQRA) process, the Village Board must complete Part 2 of the Environmental Assessment Form EAF).  Likewise, as the Village has a Waterfront Revitalization Plan under the NYS and federal Coastal Zone Management Act, the Board must also fill out a coastal assessment form to attest to consistency of these zoning actions with our local and state plan.  Each form has multiple questions to be filled in or answered.  The Board members will go over all these questions at the meeting.  The resulting document would be voted on at a subsequent meeting.

 

CORRESPONENCE:

  1. Letter from the Village of Haverstraw Board of Trustees, pursuant to SEQRA, regarding the proposed Admirals Cove Waterfront Development at 2 Doctor Girling Drive in Haverstraw.   A proposed waterfront development in Haverstraw of 251 housing units in 4, four and 5 story buildings, is undergoing SEQRA review.  The Village of Croton has been identified as an “interested party” under SEQRA because of our location opposite on the Hudson River. As a result we have received notice of the availability of the SEQRA impact statement for the project.   As an “interested party” we can request current and future documentation of the project.
  2. Croton Yacht Club Annual Calendar of Events and Fee Schedule  As part of their lease agreement with the Village, the Croton Yacht Club supplies this information to the Village annually.

 

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

  1. Consider amending the Master Fee Schedule in regards to day camp fees for the 2020 season.   The Recreation Department is proposing an increase in day camp fees for the summer of 2020.  A small discount is available for signups before 6/1/2020.  The sessions are two week sessions.  Second and third children in a family also have discounted rates.
  2. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute an agreement with Ossining Volunteer Ambulance Corps. to provide advanced life support service to the Village for the period beginning June 1, 2020, until May 31, 2023.  The Ossining Volunteer Ambulance Corps (OVAC) has provided this advanced support service to Croton since 1996.  The Croton EMS provides Basic, but not Advanced, life support.  The three-year agreement starts at $132,600 in the first year and is $143,420 in the third and final year.
  3. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute an agreement for EMT services with the Mid-Hudson Ambulance District for the period beginning June 1, 2020, through May 31, 2021.  Croton’s EMS has need for supplemental services of a trained EMT – emergency medical technician.  The Village has contracted for this service since 2011.  The proposed renewal contract calls for a rate of $24/hour in the first year.  The contract is renewable on an annual basis for three years.
  4. Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to amend the 2019-2020 General Fund Budget in the amount of $66,631.92 for monies received from Historic Hudson Valley, Clearwater Festival and Temple Israel of Northern Westchester to cover police overtime work.  These three organizations have utilized Croton Police services for safety and traffic reasons at their various events.  These costs are paid for by these organizations.  This reflects the disposition of the proceeds in the General Fund budget.
  5. Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to amend the 2019-2020 General Fund Budget in the amount of $1,708.95 for monies received for insurance recovery.  This is money received as a result of a damaged street light.
  6. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute an agreement with Lynstaar Engineering of White Plains, New York, for pre-bid design development and construction document work in regards to security design consultation services for the police department renovation project in the amount of $18,080.   This contract is part of a previously authorized bond.
  7. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute a no-cost time extension agreement with the New York State Dept. of Transportation for the Croton Point Avenue Traffic, Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project.  Croton’s agreement with the NYSDOT to complete the Croton Point Avenue Improvement project was initiated in 2010.  The time extension was agreed to in 2015 and expires in March 2020.  The NYSDOT has agreed to a further time extension to December 2022.
  8. Consider awarding Bid #6-2019 for the Croton Point Avenue Traffic, Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvement Project to Paladino Concrete Creations Corp. of Mount Vernon, New York, in the amount of $3,800,074.50.  This project was bid in November 2019.  Three bids were received.  Frank Balbi, DPW Superintendent, has reviewed the bids and recommends that Paladino be awarded the project.
  9. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute an Inter-Municipal Agreement with the Town of Cortlandt to provide Emergency Medical Services within the Mount Airy/Quaker Bridge Fire District during the period of January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020 for the amount of $66,043.   Due to its location, this area of the Town is best served by the Village of Croton’s EMS services.  This is an annual agreement between the Town and Village.

John Habib: Keeping Croton Beautiful

JLH-photo-2Dear Neighbors:

Question: “Why did the Village Board recently amend local law §197-8, issued decades ago to restrict signs placed in public rights-of-way areas?” Answer: The Board was responding to residents’ complaints about the increase in commercial signs scattered across Village-maintained areas, and amended the law because legal counsel opined that the existing law was unenforceable due to its ambiguous, outdated language. The revisions to the law were necessary for Village residents to have the benefit of a clear, constitutionally compliant law to govern any future signage enforcement actions.

To Be Clear: Posting signs on PRIVATE property is governed by broad First Amendment free speech protections. The Village government supports that private right, provided the speech is within guidelines set forth by court cases interpreting the right (e.g., prohibitions against defamatory speech, calls for violent conduct, etc.). Any law restricting signage in public right-of-way areas must be content neutral or it would be unconstitutional. Consequently, the new Village law applies to all signs in public right-of-way areas, including election-related signs.

Allowing taxpayer-maintained right-of-way areas to promote a private business or a political candidate’s career is unwise. Such signs are not just eye-sores, but they can dangerously distract drivers. And in the Green Era we now live in, such signs are too often single use plastic junk items, inevitably headed to our overflowing landfills. Bans of such signs are being enforced now more than ever, not just by small towns and villages but even by states as well. (e.g.: https://www.wcax.com/content/news/Vermont-to-crack-down-on-illegal-sign-placement-508961681.html

This amendment has nothing to do with suppressing political signage on private property. As a person who has run for elected office, I have read many experts’ conclusions that political signs planted anywhere are embarrassingly ineffective tools for garnering votes (e.g.: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/12/29/sorry-campaign-managers-lawn-signs-are-only-98-3-percent-useless/). Candidates must devise modern, impactful, environmentally sensitive campaigns filled with door-knocking, attending public hearings, volunteering for key village government committees, phone-banking, e-mail/text messaging and standing outside of railroad stations with leaflets (later collected to recycle and avoid littering). I engaged in all of these activities in the 2019 election. I shall never plant another sign (political or commercial) on public property in my life.

We must be sensitive to some local non-profit groups’ concerns that events cannot be well-promoted in light of the new restriction. But charitable organizations can and should be high profile role models for eliminating wasteful, antiquated advertising on public property. Embracing face-to-face event communication strategies (such as those mentioned above) would be a great start. And given our digital era, free/low cost communication options abound, such as the savvy use of texting and e-mail campaign software applications. In addition, organizations are invited to contact the Village for potentially posting their events on the Village calendar: (https://www.crotononhudson-ny.gov/calendar/month/2020-02).

Maximizing communication to residents must be a top goal of all governments, and so this amendment will not be enforced over-night. Prior to issuing any citations, Village officials will do their best to raise awareness that the law now is in effect.

Let’s move together as a tightly connected community embracing new standards for communication – and let’s dump public right-of-way signage onto the trash heap of history.

John Habib, Trustee

Rick Olver: We all want to keep Croton a place where middle income people can afford to live

olver2We all want to keep Croton a place where middle income people can afford to live and small businesses thrive. So why do we need to change the zoning of North Riverside and Municipal Place? To make it easier to create buildings with a mix of moderate priced housing and small business. A mix of the two can make economic sense these days. One or the other alone, not so much.

Richard Olver, Former Trustee

Brian Pugh: Eaglefest Shows What We Can Accomplish When We Work Together

Dear Neighbors:pugh2016

Last Saturday’s Eaglefest impressively produced annually by Teatown Lake Reservation is a celebration of what we can accomplish together when we preserve our common home. Teatown, Westchester County Parks and all the events sponsors deserve our thanks for showcasing the triumphant return of the Bald Eagle to the Hudson River Valley and the other creatures great & small that support our local ecosystem.

A generation ago, the bald eagle was on the verge of extinction and this great river was awash with pollution. But thanks to the concerted efforts of conservationists and concerned citizens, the eagle has coming soaring back.

Today, we are faced with many environmental challenges from the climate crisis to plastic pollution. We should all take inspiration from Teatown’s example of how we can make a difference by working together.

Despite the federal administration’s rollback of automobile efficiency standards, withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement and opening of national forests and national monuments to mining, logging and drilling, progress is being made on the state and local level.

On March 1, the plastic bag ban adopted by New York State will take effect. NY Governor Cuomo in his State of the State address, proposed the “Restore Mother Nature Bond Act”, a $3 Billion . Bond issue subject to the approval of NYS voters, for habitat restoration.

Earlier this month, Westchester County Executive George Latimer introduced legislation to the Board of Legislators that would require electric charging stations at parking garages and open parking lots owned by the County and announced that the County was awarded $3 million from New York State toward the procurement of clean fuel hybrid-electric buses.

In the last two years, the Board of Trustees for the Village of Croton, with the support of our professional staff and the volunteers of the Sustainability Committee, have:

  1. Added the first Electric Vehicles (EV) to the Village’s fleet with more EV and hybrid vehicles included in our capital plan.
  2. Applied for and been awarded a NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation grant for a food waste recycling pilot program.
  3. Approved the first community solar array in the Village of Croton, to be installed at the new DPW building.
  4. Installed public EV charging stations at the train station and at the Municipal Building.
  5. Obtained electricity from 100% renewable energy sources for all Croton households through Sustainable Westchester’s Westchester Power Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) Program.
  6. Relaunched the Solarize program, securing discounted solar energy systems for dozens of residents.

Many of these initiatives would not have been possible without financial and regulatory support from New York State. Similarly, many of the state’s environmental programs couldn’t succeed without local implementation and coordination. I appreciate what my colleagues in government at all levels are doing to make for a more sustainable future and look forward to continuing this progress regardless of which way the political winds from Washington blow.

Sincerely,

Brian Pugh, Mayor

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 479

Ann Gallelli

Sat, Feb 8, 9:51 AM ann2016

Dear neighbor, Here is the 479th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

 

 

Decoding Village Agendas –   February 12, 2020

Work Session of the Village Board

7: 30 p.m.

 (Open to Public and Televised

 

 

NOTE:  This meeting is on Wednesday evening.

 

 

  1. Review Village’s existing Vendor Use Form and discuss sustainable practices for Village events.  The Board will consider a modification of the Vendor form, similar to one used in Ossining (in backup), that calls for various practices by vendors that would promote their zero waste goal.
  2. Discussion with Chief Russel Harper of accident data in various areas of the Village.  The Police Department has been tracking such data at various locations around the village.  Chief Harper will provide this data to the Board.
  3. Review the proposed contract for the recreational kayak program at Echo Canoe Launch.  The Recreation Advisory Committee has suggested that the Village maintain its relationship with the Kayak rental company with a one-year contract renewal.  The proposed contract would allow a further one time, 3-year renewal.  The terms proposed call for a doubling of the storage fee and a payment of either $1,125 or 8% of gross income in the first year.  If renewed for an additional 3 years, the gross income percentage would increase to 8 ½%, 8 ¾% and 9% annually.
  4. Further discussion of the farmers market proposal for the 2020 season.  After receiving a report from the Recreation Advisory Committee, the Board will consider the proposal further.  The RAC favored Senasqua Park as  the best location.  The business plan would require the Village to pay the market organizer, Pascale Le Draoulec, $26,500 annually in three installments.  The organizer would provide 22 or more vendors, the rent from which would go to the Village.  The organizer would  set the rules and run the market.
  5. Consideration of extending the permitting process that was in effect in 2019 for a small number of parking spots to be reservable for retailers’ use directly outside of their leased/owned property.    Last year, the Board approved a trial experiment on allowing retailers to reserve a parking space on the public street in front of their store for their use, ex. Food truck.  The Board will consider whether to continue to permit this practice.

Brian Pugh: What’s next for Rezoning?

Dear Neighbors:brian-pugh-group-cropped

The Board of Trustees for the Village of Croton held a public hearing on a revised version of the proposed changes to the zoning code regarding the Municipal Place Gateway Overlay zone and North Riverside Avenue that were updated in response to feedback from public comments at last year’s public hearings.

I appreciate everyone that has taken part in this process, whether by correspondence with the Board, by comments at Monday’s public hearing or the two public hearings held in 2019 or by taking part in the public workshops last spring.

The Board has sought to address some of these concerns by revising the draft laws. These changes include:

1. An extension to properties on Beekman Avenue of the requirement for a 50 foot vegetated buffer along Wells Avenue).

2. A reduction in the maximum allowable floor area ratio (FAR), the ratio of a building’s total floor area to the size of the piece of land upon which it is built, for the Katz property from .8 to .5.

The proposed local laws would allow for 3-story, mixed-use construction in the Municipal Place Gateway and parts of North Riverside Avenue that are already zoned commercial (including Katz). It also reduces the permissible size of new construction, the FAR, on some parts of North Riverside and reclassifies some stretches of North Riverside and Brook Street as residential to better reflect the existing environment.

The proposed local laws will NOT change the 35 foot height maximum or the legal protections for scenic views of the Hudson River that exist in the zoning code. Also unchanged are the setback requirements for properties that abut residential properties.

Nor would the proposed changes allow for anything radically different than what already exists in our community.  Croton already has apartment houses (some, like Bari Manor and the Van Wyck Apartments, much larger than what would be allowed under the new zoning) and 3-story mixed-use buildings on Riverside and in the Upper Village.

The current zoning code does not prevent new development on North Riverside or Municipal Place and changes to the code will not automatically cause new development.  With the exception of public property, the what, when and how of development is in the hands of individual owners. The point of the code is to help harmonize any development with the needs of our community.

The 2017 update to the Village’s Comprehensive Plan, which was adopted unanimously and on a bipartisan basis by the Board of Trustees, called for a review of the zoning on North Riverside and Municipal Place.  Survey respondents and many attendees at public hearings made clear their views that any changes to the areas in question should preserve scenic vistas, minimize the impact on the environment, manage traffic, and preserve community character. All these priorities are reflected in the original proposed zoning amendments and the very recent edits to the first drafts.

I believe it’s important to encourage new investment in our community to broaden the tax base so we can control property taxes. We need new housing opportunities, both affordable and market-rate, for people of all income levels for seniors, young people and for others for whom home ownership is not a viable or desirable option.

Absent new housing options, population growth combined with a fixed housing supply will inexorably lead to hire prices that make our community unaffordable for middle class families. Further, trying to block new homes in our Village will push growth into other towns, exacerbating the problem of sprawl. Many of those same individuals, who might otherwise have lived in Croton, will still be on our streets as commuters headed towards Metro North or down Route 9–still burdening our roads, still adding to local air pollution but not contributing to the tax base and rarely, if ever, patronizing local businesses.

We also need to encourage mixed-use development that encourages walkability. By putting homes near businesses, we can reduce the number of vehicle trips people take, mitigating air pollution and promoting public health and exercise.  Similarly, by creating walkable mixed-use areas, we create a natural customer base for local businesses and support shopping local.

The Village applied this concept in Harmon through rezoning several years ago. At the time this was controversial. We are now seeing positive results in Harmon with new business and housing opportunities for our community.

Residents have valid concerns about how growth could affect traffic and quality of life. The Board of Trustees has sought to address some of those concerns in our revisions to the proposed local laws. If these local laws are adopted, we will use the Request for Proposals process and work with the Planning Board to make sure any and all proposals are as much of a win for our community as Harmon rezoning has been.

Sincerely,

Brian Pugh

 

 

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 478

ann2016Dear neighbor, Here is the 478th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – February 3, 2020

Regular Meeting of the Village Board

8:00 pm

(Open to Public – Televised)

 

 

PRESENTATIONS/OTHER: 

Presentation of proclamations to Croton-Harmon High School teachers Tracey Finan and Joseph Streany for achieving national certification from the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards.

 

PUBLIC HEARINGS:

  1. Public Hearing to consider Local Law Introductory No. 2 of 2020 to amend Chapter 197 of the Village Code, Streets and Sidewalks, to prohibit signage in the Village’s right-of-way.  The proposed amendment to the law clarifies the language in the existing law to prohibit signage in the Village’s right-of-way.

 

  1. Public Hearing to consider Local Law Introductory No. 9 of 2019 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, with regards to the Municipal Place Gateway area.  As a result of information and discussion from previous work sessions and public hearings some modifications were made to the original version of this zoning amendment. As a result, a new public hearing was called.  For the Katz property in this overlay district, the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) was reduced to .5 from .8 in the earlier version.

 

 

  1. Public Hearing to consider Local Law Introductory No. 10 of 2019 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, with regards to the North Riverside Avenue neighborhood. As a result of information and discussion from previous work sessions and public hearings some modifications were made to the original version of this zoning amendment.  In the proposed new zone of C1RB, a 10 foot rear setback would be required where none was previously required.

 

 

CORRESPONENCE:

  1. Email from John Munson, Fire Council Secretary, regarding membership changes in the fire department.  Fire Council Secretary Munson notifies the village of two new Active members and the switch of one Active member to Social member.

 

  1. Email from John Munson, Fire Council Secretary, requesting permission for the fire department to hold their big ticket raffle fundraiser.   Fire Council Secretary is seeking permission from the Village to hold their annual raffle.  The winner  will be drawn at the end of Summerfest in early June.

 

 

  1. Email from Andy Finkelstein, co-chair of Diversity & Inclusion Committee, regarding a proposed candlelight vigil with Croton-Harmon High School.  The Village’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee is interested in supporting a candlelight vigil organized by CHHS students.

 

 

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

  1. Consider amending the Master Fee Schedule to revise the vendor fees for Summerfest.  In order to help cover increased costs associated with the event, this proposed amendment to the Fee Schedule would increase fees for vendor spots at the event. Early bird registrations (before May 1) would be discounted.

 

  1. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to sign the 2020 Quaker Bridge Fire District Agreement with the Town of Cortlandt to provide fire protection services within the Mount Airy/Quaker Bridge Fire Protection District from January 1, 2020 until December 31, 2020.  This annual agreement between the Town and Village provides for fire protection within the designated district.  The Town will pay $347,535.00 of which $69,507.00 will go directly to the Croton Fire Council and $278,028.00 will go to the Village.

 

 

  1. Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to relevy a past due receivable in the amount of $1,400 to the property owner of 2 Birch Court.  This permits the Treasurer to put this past due bill on the property owners tax bill  for the 2020/2021 Fiscal Year  taxes.

 

  1. Consider revision of the conditions listed in the special permit issued to New York SMA Limited Partnership d/b/a Verizon Wireless for the proposed co-location of a personal wireless services facility at the Municipal Building, 1 Van Wyck Street.  Verizon Wireless has submitted some changes to the drawings approved as part of their Special Permit for their installation at the Municipal Building.  The Village Engineer has reviewed these and agreed that these are minor changes and do not require an amendment to the special permit. This resolution confirms the Village accepts that determination.

 

  1. Consider adoption of a resolution denouncing anti-Semitism and the the recent anti-Semitic attacks in Monsey and Yorktown.  The Village is joining other communities at the behest of the anti-Defamation League in denouncing the recent attacks in Westchester and Rockland.  The resolution includes the following:

      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: the Village Board is committed to promoting

openness, inclusion, freedom and mutual understanding by ensuring all people,

regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin or

immigration status may live free from violence, harassment or prejudice. The

Board will make every effort to ensure that our community is one where all people

are welcome, included and respected

 

  1. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute an agreement with Calgi Construction Co. of White Plains, New York, for pre-bid design development and construction document work for the police department renovation project in the amount of $27,300.  Calgi would manage the renovation’s design phase documents for the pre-bid work which entails coordination among multiple subcontractors.

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 477

ann2016Dear neighbor, Here is the 477th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetingsI continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

 

 

Decoding Village Agendas –   January 27, 2020

Work Session of the Village Board

7: 30 p.m.

 (Open to Public and Televised

 

 

NOTE:  The overviews of the operations of the following departments are part of a continuing process begun in early January whereby Board members and the public can become fully acquainted with the various responsibilities of the respective departments.  Departmental activities are directly related to budget requests.  The upcoming 2020/2021 Fiscal Year Budget is in the early stages of being developed and will be presented in mid-March.

 

  1. Overview of the day-to-day operations of the Public Works Department.
  2. Overview of the day-to-day operations of the Parking Department.
  3. Overview of the day-to-day operations of the Treasurer’s Office.
  4. Overview of the day-to-day operations of the Village Clerk’s Office.
  5. Overview of the day-to-day operations of the Village Manager’s Office.

This is great, thank you!

Thank you!

Thank you for the information.

Brian Pugh: Health Insurance Deadline Is 1/31

Dear Neighbors:brian-pugh-group-cropped

I am writing to remind readers that the deadline for 2020  health insurance coverage through the NYS healthcare marketplace, New York State of Health, is Friday, January 31st.  The web site for the NY State of Health is: nystateofhealth.ny.gov

NY State of Health is a regulated insurance exchange meant to provide insurance coverage for individuals not covered by an employer’s insurance, Medicare or another plan.

Hundreds of residents of the Village of Croton are not insured, according to the Census.  The majority of these uninsured residents are native born US citizens. Most are children and young adults.

Health insurance protects from unexpected, high medical costs. Insurance also means free preventive care, like vaccines, screenings, and check-ups.

Please remind your family and friends to make sure they have health insurance coverage.

For assistance with enrollment, you can contact the NY State of Health’s helpline 1-855-355-5777. The helpline is open Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Sincerely,

Brian Pugh, Mayor

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 476

ann2016Dear neighbor, Here is the 476th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

 

 

 

Decoding Village Agendas – January 21, 2020

Regular Meeting of the Village Board

8:00 pm

(Open to Public – Televised)

 

 

NOTE:  This Regular meeting is on a Tuesday due to  Martin Luther King Day holiday.

 

 

 

PUBLIC HEARINGS:

  1. Public hearing to consider adoption of Local Law Introductory No. 1 of 2020 to override the property tax cap.  Since the inception of the Property Tax Levy Cap in NYS in 2012, it is necessary for each municipality to pass a law to allow it to override the Tax Cap in the event unforeseen circumstances require it.  A penalty would be imposed if the tax levy is exceeded without the passage of this law.

 

CORRESPONENCE:

  1. Letter from Michelle Minoff, Director of Community Engagement at Temple Israel of Northern Westchester, thanking the Village Board and staff for the Community Hanukkah Celebration.  Ms. Minoff thanked the Village and said it was a meaningful event for everyone.
  2. Croton Point Avenue Traffic, Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project Updates:

 

Email from Orietta Trocard, Regional Local Projects Manager for NYSDOT, regarding additional funding for the Croton Point Avenue Traffic, Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project.  The letter from the NYSDOT notifies the Village of receiving $750,000 for the project in addition to the $250,000 previous allotted to it by the DOT.

 

Letter from Gabriela Paladino, President of Paladino Concrete Creations Corp., regarding the bid pricing for the Croton Point Avenue Traffic, Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project.   The letter extends the hold time on their bid price until March 3, 2020.

 

 

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

  1. Consider scheduling a Public Hearing to amend Chapter 197 of the Village Code, Streets and Sidewalks, to prohibit signage in the Village’s right-of-way for Monday, February 3, 2020, at 8 PM in the Georgianna Grant Meeting Room of the Stanley H. Kellerhouse Municipal Building.    The proposed Local Law would prohibit posting of signs, flyers, etc. as specified in Section 197-8 below:

197-8. Posting notices and the scattering/placing/tossing of advertisements.

No person shall place, post, affix, or otherwise put up any written, printed, or painted sign or notice on

any of the trees, poles, walls, fences or buildings on or along any of the streets, rights-of-way or public

places in said Village, nor scatter, place, or throw any advertisements or notices nor cause the same to be scattered, placed, or thrown along or in any of the streets, rights-of-way or public places in said Village.

 

  1. Consider scheduling a Public Hearing to consider Local Law Introductory No. 9 of 2019 and Local Law Introductory No. 10 of 2019 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, with regards to the Municipal Place Gateway area for Monday, February 3, 2020, at 8 PM in the Georgianna Grant Meeting Room of the Stanley H. Kellerhouse Municipal Building.  The Village Board is calling for a Public Hearing on Local Laws Introductory No. 9 and No. 10 regarding zoning modifications in the Municipal Place Gateway area.  As a result of input from a prior Public Hearing, some changes made in the substance of the law, specifically a reduction in the Floor Area Ratio from .8 to .5. requiring another public hearing.