Len Simon: Food Scrap Recycling Pilot Coming to Croton

Len Simon, Village Trustee

To those in Croton who lift their trash lids and think “It sure would be great if the Village sponsored a food scrap recycling program” – here’s some good news!

Croton will soon be running a pilot six-month program that will recycle food scraps so they can be converted into compost. It will be open to 40 Croton households and run from Saturday, January 7, 2023, through Saturday, June 24, 2023. If you’d like to participate, visit the Village website (crotononhudson-ny.gov) and click on Sustainability Committee under “Boards and Committees”. Once there, at News and Announcements on the right, the top news will tell you all about the Food Scrap Recycling program.

This new initiative is a great example of an all-hands-on-deck partnership. Since waste reduction and recycling is an important Village goal, our Sustainability Committee, led by Lindsay Audin, sought and was awarded a grant for the Village from the NY Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) for this pilot. Subsequently, the Committee has worked with DEC, our DPW and the Westchester County Residential Food Scrap Transportation and Disposal Program to get the program underway. Our Conservation Advisory Council and great groups like Croton100 and Mothers Our Front will help us to get the word out.

Monday night our Board of Trustees approved an Intermunicipal Agreement for the County program. Our bagged scraps will be picked up weekly by a county truck and taken to a commercial composting facility in Cortlandt Manor.

The program will be described, and materials distributed at a kick-off meeting at noon on Sunday, Dec. 4, 2022, in the Municipal Building Community Room – the only opportunity to complete the sign-up process and receive the necessary start- up supplies.

Croton has an “all of the above” strategy for sustainability – now we can add this food scrap recycling pilot to our tool kit. We look forward to a great kick-off, success for the pilot and then, with your help, looking at next steps for food scrap recycling in Croton.

Len Simon, Trustee

Village of Croton-on-Hudson

Ann Gallelli: Board Reviews New Zoning for South Riverside & Croton Point Avenue Area

Ann Gallelli, Village Trustee

Dear Neighbors:

At last Monday’s Board of Trustees meeting, a Public Hearing was opened to consider two Local Laws that would amend existing Village Zoning laws. The Village Board has been studying these proposed zoning changes for some time and has engaged AKRF Consultants to study the impacts and the possible outcomes if these laws are implemented.  AKRF representative Aaron Werner presented the study results at the Public Hearing.  

It is important to remember that this is the beginning of a lengthy process in which the Board is required to perform complete SEQRA and Consistency reviews.  Public input is an important part of this process.  To that end, this week’s Public Hearing was not closed and will remain open for more comments in the future.  Beyond that, it is important to understand that these are zoning amendments, i.e. changes to what might be legally built, and not actual projects.  

Here are the highlights of the presentation.  Proposed Local Law #11 would expand the area of the currently existing Harmon South Riverside Gateway (HSRG) area to include 4 parcels on Wayne and Clinton Streets as well as the lot on the southeast side of South Riverside, the location of ET Equipment.  (The latter site Is proposed to have its current split zoning of C-2 and RA-5 combined to all C-2).  Proposed Local Law #12 would affect only the 3 parcels on Croton Point Avenue, west of Route 9 which are located in the Light Industrial (LI) zoning district to allow Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Zoning.

Proposed Local Laws 11 and 12 would allow, by Special Permit, multi-family residential or mixed-use (residential above commercial) as a Special Permit Use in their respective districts.  While Mixed-Use development is already allowed by Special Permit in the HSRG area, this would also be extended to the TOD designated area. Both proposed local laws would allow Multi-family residential use as well by Special Permit.    The height and FAR restrictions in the HSRG zone would remain at 35’ and 0.8 FAR.  The new proposed TOD area in the LI district would permit 5 stories and a 1.2 FAR (Floor Area Ratio).

AKRF was asked by the Village to analyze the potential outcomes of these zoning changes if they were fully implemented within their respective zoning districts. They have provided data on the maximum buildout scenario where all existing uses would be replaced by Mixed use or Multi-family developments (an unlikely scenario). The analyses included total potential buildout data as well as schools, traffic and visual impacts.  All this data is available on the Village website under Projects and Initiatives.

While these proposed zoning changes may appear to be substantial, past experience indicates that buildout as a result of zoning changes  tend to be very gradual, usually dependent upon decisions by individual property owners.  As an example, in the 10-plus years since the Harmon Gateway Zoning was implemented which, for the first time, allowed mixed-uses (residential above commercial) in an area with 45 eligible parcels, only one mixed-use building has been erected with 8 residential units at 379 South Riverside.

The Board expects this to be a thorough process and welcomes public input.  Opening a public hearing on the proposed changes in the early stage, as occurred this week, is a way to ensure maximum knowledge and understanding of the proposed zoning changes.  It is hoped that residents will keep raising the questions that need to be answered as the proposals move ahead.  

Ann Gallelli, Deputy Mayor

Len Simon: Croton Awarded FEMA Funds for Firefighters

Len Simon, Trustee

Dear Neighbors

Croton residents send a good portion of our tax dollars to Washington every year. So, it is great when we get them back to provide vital services here in the Village. That’s why an email the Village received on Friday which began: “Congratulations! Your grant application submitted under the Grant Programs Directorate’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2021 Assistance to Firefighters Grants has been approved for award” was very welcome news indeed.

The Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG) program is administered through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Since 2001, AFG has helped firefighters and other first responders obtain critically needed equipment, protective gear, emergency vehicles, training and other resources necessary for protecting the public and emergency personnel from fire and related hazards.

Croton was awarded $39,000 to acquire vital equipment such as air packs, masks and other priorities for our dedicated volunteer firefighters. We do our best to provide the resources which the Fire Department needs. But the help we can get from the federal side is appreciated as a very beneficial supplement to our own local funding.

There was a time when the federal government provided no direct assistance to first responders, believing that was solely a local responsibility. Fortunately, local elected officials around the country, joined by their police, fire, and EMS leaders turned that philosophy around and convinced Congress and the White House to start making these investments in safety. The results were programs such as the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) in the Justice Department and FEMA programs like AFG and Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER).

Croton will always be careful when it comes to applying for federal grants. We want to make sure it is our priorities which drive the pursuit of these funds, and not the other way around. In the case of AFG we were fortunate to be guided by Village Manager Bryan Healy and his team and Fire Chief John Munson, whose excellent collaboration led to this AFG grant success.

Rainy weather caused our 9/11 ceremony this year to take place in the Harmon Firehouse. In some ways though, it was so appropriate since the bravery and sacrifice of our firefighters is so much of what 9/11 means to us all. Croton’s Fire Department deserves the best resources available, and we will do our best to make sure that is so.

Len Simon, Trustee
Village of Croton-on-Hudson

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 595

Dear neighbor, Here is the 595th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list. 

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas –  September 19, 2022 

 Regular Meeting of the Village Board

7:00 pm

Georgianna Grant Room

Municipal Building

PUBLIC HEARINGS:

Public Hearing to consider Local Law Introductory No. 11 of 2022 and Local Law Introductory No. 12 of 2022 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, determining that the Proposed Action is a Type 1 Action under SEQRA, declaring the Village Board to be Lead Agency under SEQRA, issuing the EAF and CAF and referring the necessary documents to the Village Planning Board, Waterfront Advisory Committee and Westchester County Planning Board as required by law.

Local Law 11 would expand the area of the Harmon South Riverside Gateway Overlay area to include several lots at the north end of Wayne Street as well as the lot on South Riverside where ET Equipment is currently located.  It would also expand the zone’s potential uses to include multi-family residential.

Local Law 12 would allow Transit Oriented Development (TOD) in the Light Industrial  (LI) zone at the west end of Croton Point Avenue, west of Route 9 on lots fronting on Croton Point Avenue.  (Currently this is where Parking Lot A is located and two commercial buildings.)  Allowable uses would include both mixed-use and multi-family residential with a maximum height of 40 feet or 5 stories.

Backup documents, including studies by the Village consultants, AKRF, are available on the Agenda website.


CORRESPONDENCE:

a.       Email from FEMA regarding the FY 2021 Assistance to Firefighters Grant Award Notification.  The Village is notified that they will be recipients of a Firefighters Grant award previously applied for.

b.      Notice of Application from Champlain Hudson Power Express to the Public Service Commission regarding the proposed circuit from the Canadian Border to New York City.   The Village is being notified that a certificate of environmental compatibility issued to the Champlain Hudson Power Express in 2013 is under consideration for amendment by the NYS PSC.  The Village is notifed as an “interested party” as the project affects the Hudson River.

c.       Notice of Intent from the Croton-Harmon School District to declare Lead Agency under SEQRA on the Croton Harmon UFSD/District-Wide Capital Improvement/Infrastructure Project.  The Village is notified of the School District’s intent to undertake some major infrastructure and building improvement projects which will occur in the boundaries of the Village of Croton-on-Hudson.

d. Letter from Petra Vatne requesting a building permit fee waiver for the property   at 217 Half Moon Bay Drive.  The Vatne’s are completing awork initially permitted to a contractor but now being completed by themselves.  They would like a refund of the permit fee.

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

a.      Consider scheduling a public hearing on Local Law Introductory No. 13 of 2022 to amend Chapter 215 of the Village Code, Vehicles and Traffic, for Monday, October 3, at 7 PM. This calls for a public hearing that would amend the Vehicle and Traffic Law to permit 4 hour parking of non-permitted vehicles located on streets in the Residential Parking System areas.

b.      Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to make an interfund transfer in the amount of $7,750 for new Village wayfinding signs.   The signs would replace the existing wayfinding signs, which have been weathered over a number of years and the signs will also be updated to ensure visitors to the Village know where municipal parking exists.

c.       Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to amend the General Fund 2022-2023 budget in the amount of $310,617.69 to allocate funds for Department of Public Works based services.  This reallocates funds to the specific DPW accounts in which the services were provided.

d.      Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to make an interfund transfer in the amount of $3,270.24 for decorative planters in the Upper Village.   The Village would install three decorative planters at the intersection of Grand Street and Old Post Road South in the Upper Village. The purpose of these planters is to enhance pedestrian safety at the intersection in line with the Bicycle Pedestrian Committee’s Master Plan document

e.       Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute a license agreement with Regan Development Corporation to permit access to the property located at 41-51 Maple Street for site work preparations.  The Village and the developer of the former Katz property are working towards the official property closing. The developer would like to begin site work before the official closing takes place. This agreement would allow for such work to proceed. 

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 594

Dear neighbor, Here is the 594th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – September 12,  2022

Work Session of the Village Board

7:30 pm

Georgianna Grant Room

Municipal Building

NOTE:  This meeting starts at 7:30 pm.

1.   First Quarter Financial Update   Treasurer Tucker presents the first quarter update showing an increase in budgeted revenue of $430,309 and First Quarter expenses of $5,488,943.30.

2.      Discussion on Updated Senior Tax Exemption   NYS recently passed legislation that increases the eligibility for Senior Property Tax Exemptions from an annual income of $29,000 to $50,000.  Each taxing authority can decide whether to opt-in to this or not. Manager Healy provided the following information regarding Senior property exemptions in Croton as background for this discussion:

 The Village currently maintains a senior tax exemption at the maximum level of 50% for those senior citizens earning $29,000/year or less. There is also a downward sliding scale for those earning more than $29,000/year, but less than $37,400/year. As of this year, a total of 35 properties have applied for and received the senior tax exemption. Unlike other tax exemptions (firefighter and veteran), seniors must apply annually for this exemption to ensure their income remains within the eligible range. In trying to determine how many residents would be eligible under this new legislation, I reviewed the income data contained in the 2013-2017 American Community Survey for the Village. There are approximately 350 households that earn less than $30,000, meaning that 10% of those households are eligible for and have applied for the senior tax exemption. An additional 250 households make between $30,000 and $50,000. If we were to extrapolate this data based on the preceding numbers, we could reasonably expect another 25 households to be eligible for a new senior tax exemption. I also reviewed the number of households currently receiving the Enhanced STAR exemption in the Village. The number of households receiving this exemption is 162 (data provided by the Town of Cortlandt). The Enhanced STAR income level ($93,200) is approximately double that of the new senior property tax exemption level. Based on this information, we could reasonably expect another 46 households to be eligible for a new senior tax exemption.”

3.   Harmon Parking Survey Results  The Village recently sent a survey to residents of the Benedict Blvd, Hastings and Young Avenues area of the Village in regard to complaints about the consistency of regulations in this area and a possible change in regulations as follows: a proposal to implement a four-hour maximum street parking rule, effective weekdays between 7 AM and 7 PM on Benedict Boulevard, Hastings Avenue, and Young Avenue outside of the Residential Parking Permit Area. .  Of 83 surveys sent out, 29 were returned.  With 16 saying parking was still an issue on their street, 15 support a change in regulations and 12 oppose.

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 593

Dear neighbor, Here is the 593rdinstallment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – September 6, 2022

 Meeting of the Village Board of Trustees

In the Georgianna Grant room

Stanley Kellerhouse Municipal Building

7:00 pm

  

CORRESPONDENCE:

a.      Memo from Village Manager Bryan Healy regarding the Village’s Assessing Unit Status.  Manager Healy presents various options for the Village Board to consider with regard to retaining a Village Assessment roll or switching to the Town’s assessment roll.  With the recent death of Village Assessor Waitkins, Croton currently has no Assessor.  The Village has the option of giving up its assessing role and using the assessment of the Town.   The Village assessment is used to determine a resident’s Village Tax.  This tax is approximately 30% of a resident’s total tax bill.  The remaining 70% (County, School and Town taxes) are based on the Town’s assessment, not the Village’s.

b.      Letters from Senator Peter Harckham and DOT Regional Director Lance MacMillan regarding repairs to the Route 9/9A Right-of-Way Fencing.  Following a letter from Senator Harckham regarding the un-repaired fence on Route 9/91, Regional Director MacMillan replied that it will be repaired sometime this Fall.

c.       Emails from John Munson, Fire Council Secretary, regarding membership changes in the Croton Fire Department.  As required, the Fire Council is updating the Village Board on fire Department membership changes.

d.      Referral from the Town of Cortlandt regarding a Public Hearing for the property located at 1065 Quaker Bridge Road East.   The Village is being Noticed of a public hearing on a site plan application and Special Permit for a non-school curriculum program at the former Danish Home for the Aged.

e.       Referral from the Town of Cortlandt regarding a Public Hearing for the property located at 2006 Albany Post Road.  The Village is being Noticed of a Public Hearing for a renewal of the existing special permit for this property at the north boundary of the Village.  Since its initial permitting, a new garage has been added to the property.

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

a.      Consider scheduling a Public Hearing for September 19, 2022, at 7 PM, in the Georgianna Grant Meeting Room of the Stanley H. Kellerhouse Municipal Building to consider Local Law Introductory No. 9 of 2022 and Local Law Introductory No. 10 of 2022 to amend Chapter 230 of the Village Code, Zoning, determining that the Proposed Action is a Type 1 Action under SEQRA, declaring the Village Board to be Lead Agency under SEQRA, issuing the EAF and CAF and referring the necessary documents to the Village Planning Board, Waterfront Advisory Committee and Westchester County Planning Board as required by law.  The Board is taking the first steps in amending its zoning laws by scheduling a Public Hearing for two proposed amendments.  Local Law 9 would expand the area of what is now the Harmon Gateway Overlay zone to include property on the east side of South Riverside, across from ShopRite as well 5 lots on Wayne Street.  It would also permit multi-family residential use as a permitted use and not restrict the third story roofline.  Local Law 10 would allow Transit Oriented Development (TOD) for mixed use and multi-family residential use in the Light Industrial (LI) district in the lots to the west of Route 9 fronting on Croton Point Avenue.   In preparing for these proposed zoning changes, the Village has utilized the consultant services of AKRF.  Their reports and analyses are available as part of the backup documents to this agenda.

b.    Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to make an interfund transfer in the amount of $2,500 for a property appraisal.  This is a required step for the application for a NYS EV Charger grant.

c.       Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to process a tax refund in the amount of $2,607.54 for the property located at 5 O’Riley Court (designated on the tax maps as Section 67.20, Block 003, Lot 035.12) due to the settlement of a SCAR petition.  As a result of a Court of Assessment review decision, a refund will be made.

Decoding Village Agendas No. 592

Dear neighbor, Here is the 592nd installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list.

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – August 22,  2022

Work Session of the Village Board

7:00 pm

Georgianna Grant Room

Municipal Building

1.      Consider entering into an Executive Session to discuss the proposed acquisition, sale or lease of real property.

2.      Consider approval of the Memorandum of Agreement with Croton-on-Hudson PBA regarding COVID-19 testing.  This is an agreement with the Croton Police Benevolent Association ((PBA) to end the surveillance testing program for unvaccinated officers. The CDC no longer recommends this kind of testing. The program was set to end at the end of the calendar year.

3.      Update on the South Riverside / Harmon rezoning study.  The Village Attorney and Manager will provide an update on the work that has occurred since the Board initiated consideration of adopting amendments to Village Zoning Law and provisions of the Village Zoning Code related to a) the Harmon/South Riverside Gateway (“HSRG”) Overlay and b) Light Industrial (“LI”) zoning districts. The draft Local Laws, outlining the specific proposed amendments, are included in the backup documents for this meeting. In summary, the Proposed Action would facilitate:

 • An expansion of the HSRG Overlay district to include five additional tax parcels. These parcels are on Wayne Street and across from Shop Rite plaza.,

• A change to the underlying zoning of one of the parcels proposed to be added to the HSRG Overlay (Parcel 47 – tax parcel #79.13-2-91) from a split-zone of C-2/RA-5 to C-2. This is the parcel opposite Shop rite Plaza.

• New zoning text to allow multifamily residential development as a special permit use within the expanded HSRG Overlay district;

 • New zoning text to allow multifamily residential or mixed-use Transit-Oriented Development (“TOD”) as a special permit use within a specified portion of the LI district along Croton Point Avenue.  This would apply to parcels to the west of Route 9 highway at the top of the railroad station entrance.

4.      Continued review of proposed changes to accessory apartment law.   The discussion will cover the County’s proposed Model Ordnance for Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) on residentially zoned properties.

5.      Discussion on the Village’s Assessing Unit Status.  As a result of the untimely passing of Village Assessor Tom Waitkins, the Village must determine whether to engage a new Assessor or become part of the larger Town of Cortlandt Assessing unit.  In Westchester County, 13 of the 20 villages no longer have their own assessing unit.  The Board will discuss the pluses and minuses of taking this decision.

6.      Discussion on drainage along Brook Street.  In a 2004 Stormwater Management Study performed for the Village by Dvirka & Bartilucci , Brook Street drainage corridor was identified as one of four priority subdrainage systems. In light of some recent issues, the Manager will discuss possible options for improvements.

7.      Update on potential community garden at Gouveia Park. The proposed garden would be located behind the existing Quonset Hut on the eastern side of the park. After visits by members of the CAC and the Community Garden committee, it was determined that the location appears to receive sufficient daytime sun and would require little tree removal.  An estimate for the work required to put the garden in place, prepared by Superintendent Balbi, is $42,900.  If approved, Manager Healy would like this to come from the Gouveia Endowment Fund.

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 590

Dear neighbor, Here is the 590th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list. 

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – August 1, 2022 

 Meeting of the Village Board of Trustees

In the Georgianna Grant room

Stanley Kellerhouse Municipal Building

7:00 pm

.  

CORRESPONDENCE:

  1. Memo from Village Manager BryanHealy regarding an update on the Merwin Oak.  Manager Healy describes the efforts being made to direct pieces of the Merwin Oakto various Village locations and use them for various commemorative purposes.
  2. Letter from Annie Mykyta, Village resident, formally requesting removal of the property at 1 Alexander lane from the Ossining Sanitary Sewer District. Ms. Mykyta states that the nearest sanitary sewer main is more than 200 feet from her property line.
  3. Email from Copernicus Crane, Assistant Director of Intergovernmental Relations for Westchester County, regarding upcoming public engagement sessions on bus mobility in Westchester County.  The County is seeking better ways to increase the mobility network including the Bee Line Bus system. Four information sessions are being held via zoom.  The times and dates are available on the Village agenda the Villages website.
  4. Compilation of energy date from municipal buildings for 2021 in accordance with the Village’s Benchmarking policy.  The report compares electric use, natural gas and heating oil use at various municipal buildings from2020 and 2021.
  5. Letter fromJohn Munson, President\Secretary of the Croton Fire Council, regarding a proposal to change residency requirements for the positions of Chief, First Assistant Chief, and Second Assistant Chief of the Croton Volunteer Fire Department.  In an effort to increase recruitment and retention in the Department, the proposal would allow candidates to reside in adjacent Towns of Cortlandt, New Castle, Ossining and Yorktown to seek the positions of Chief mentioned above. Currently they must reside in the Village or the Mount Airy\Quaker Bridge fire protection district.

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS:

  1. Consider scheduling a Public Hearing on Monday, August 15, 2022 at 7 pm to consider the issuance of a special permit for a 29-unit multi-family development at 1380 Albany Post Road.  The proposal was referred to the Planning Board which gave a favorable recommendation.  
  2. Consider authorizing the Village Manager to execute the Memorandum of Understanding between the Housing Action Council (HAC) and the Village of Croton for work under the Housing Technical assistance Program.  The following services will be provided to the Village: 1} provide recommendations for the adoption of an Overlay Affordable Housing Zone, and 2} explore the preliminary feasibility of developing affordable housing on lots owned by the Village through participation in the Fall 2022 Land Use Leadership Alliance Training Program with identified leaders form the Croton Housing Task Force, municipality, Croton Housing Network, and others as may be appropriate. 
  3. Consider amending the Master Fee Schedule to establish vendor fees for the 2022 Fall Festival.  New fees specifically for this event are being put in place.
  4. Consider authorizing the Village Treasurer to close capital accounts associated with various projects,reclassify $50,000 fromProject 20372 to Project 21383, and close and deposit an encumbrance of $13,204.22 into the General Fund.  Several capital projects have been completed and this authorizes the associated accounts.

Ann Gallelli: Decoding Village Agendas No. 589

Dear neighbor, Here is the 589th installment of Decoding Village Agendas to keep Croton residents informed of the actions of the Village Board at their meetings.  I continue to add recipients to this email update on agendas so you may be receiving it for the first time. I enjoy getting your feedback and hope to continue to hear from you.  If you do not wish to receive these periodic email updates from me, please reply to this email and your name will be removed from the email list. 

Ann Gallelli

Decoding Village Agendas – July 11,  2022 

Work Session of the Village Board

7:00 pm

Georgianna Grant Room

Municipal Building

1.      Review of proposal from Homeland Towers, LLC, to erect a telecommunications tower on Village property at 230 Hessian Hills Road.    The proposal is to build a tower that would enable co-location of multiple wireless tenants. This avoids tower proliferation and minimizes the impact on the surrounding environment. The Village would license co-locators and receive income from them.

2.       Evaluation of current Accessory Apartment Law in relation to Westchester County Model Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) Ordinance.  The Objective of the County Model Ordinance is to 

a. Create new housing units while respecting the look and scale of single-dwelling development; 

b. Support more efficient use of existing housing stock and infrastructure; 

c. Offer environmentally friendly housing choices with less average space per person and smaller associated carbon footprints; 

d. Provide housing that responds to changing family needs, smaller households, and increasing housing costs; and e. Provide accessible housing for seniors and persons with disabilities

The Board will discuss this in the context of the Croton’s Housing Task Force report and the Village’s existing zoning regulations.

3.      Continued discussion on establishing the Village’s food scrap recycling program. The Village is proposing to provide an easy way for residents to compost food waste by providing an easily accessible drop-off site, maintained by the DPW.  This proposal is for a 6-month Pilot program and would seek 40-50 families to participate.

4.      Update on Park Maintenance Items.    The Manager will address concerns regarding goose droppings at Senasqua Park and algae at Kaplan’s Pond and the Duck Pond.